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71 years of struggle for a welfare state

It is high time that all the stakeholders should initiate a meaningful dialogue for a modern, democratic country that is the only road to salvation

71 years of struggle for a welfare state

71 years of our nationhood has witnessed many upheavals — a journey from crisis to crisis has at its core the struggle for establishing a true democratic polity and a welfare state. The way united opposition is agitating alleged pre and post-poll rigging in the aftermath of 2018 elections testifies that inclination to evolve a national consensus for people’s rule is still a distant dream after seven decades of independence. Liberation from colonial masters in 1947 to continuous subjugation in the hands of powerful classes — militro-judicial-civil complex, businessmen-turned-politicians and absentee land owners — remains the real and painful dilemma for the masses.

The failures on political, economic and social fronts during the decade of democracy (2008-2018) once again confirm lack of determination on the part of politicians to act collectively and resolutely to defeat the de facto power—thus the apprehensions of strengthening of ‘garrison state’ are proving true. The significant achievements in many areas during the last 71 years have been dampened by the non-existence of national cohesion and people’s rule where masses can get real benefits of growth and resources.

Despite all odds — indifference and apathy of political leadership, helplessness of masses and long military rules — the nation has showed resilience and unshakable faith in electoral process whenever they got a chance. They did it on July 25, 2018 as well by giving unequivocal verdict against the forces of obscurantism (fooling the masses in the name of religion). It is now the collective responsibility of all democratic forces to galvanise and mobilise masses for consolidating democracy and countering forces bent upon “controlling” elected institutions.

Legislators should send a clear message to courts to interpret the laws and refrain from indulging in real politik. Enforcing the will of people is essentially a political question that cannot be resolved in courts. Since our leadership has failed in the past on this account, the entire society faced devastating effects of unrepresentive rules — approved by higher courts.

Genesis and evolution of Pakistan remains a challenging enigma for historians and political scientists. Voluminous work, produced on the subject since the partition of Subcontinent in 1947, seeks to explain the interplay of two interwoven and interlinked factors behind the turbulent state — religion and militarism. The political use of ‘religion’ in demanding a separate homeland for Muslims and its later abuse by establishment with the help of clergy to capture power and establish a ‘Garrison State’ is in a nutshell, the sad story of Pakistan.

Legislators should send a clear message to courts to interpret laws and refrain from indulging in real politik. Enforcing the will of people is a political question.

It is elaborated intensely by political scientist, Dr Ishtiaq Ahmed, in his book, Pakistan: The Garrison State: Origins, Evolution, Consequences 1947-2011. The book presents and analyses historic record — largely shrouded in mystery and distorted by vested interests — to show what actually ails Pakistan — the fifth most populous (207.8 million) country in the world, and having a geostrategic position that is not ignorable for global and regional powers.

Dr Ishtiaq, in his meticulously-researched and thematically focused work, has explored the evolution of Pakistan from a weak state to a self-acclaimed “fortress of Islam” — the concept that proved fallacious in the wake of its dismemberment in 1971, yet insisted upon by many. This work, unlike others, is based on a conceptual and theoretical framework combining the notion of a post-colonial state and Harold Lasswell’s concept of a ‘Garrison State’. In the very first chapter entitled, ‘The Fortress of Islam: A metaphor for a Garrison State’, the author has shown how a state famished at the time of its birth transformed into a nuclear power, though engulfed by multiple crises — political, economic, social, religious, etc.

Dr Ishtiaq explains emergence of Pakistan as a ‘Garrison State’ during the Cold War and dominance of army over all other institutions since then. The rise of military to this level has both internal and external factors.

Historically speaking, its roots go back to military interests of the United States in this region on the fall of British Empire. Branding and marketing of Pakistan as a ‘frontline state’ have been documented by the author creating a furore in some circles that would never accept the truth. History of the garrison state, as analysed by Dr Ishtiaq, explodes many myths, depicts the true events and exposes many faces that ultimately rendered the “fortress of Islam” to a “CIA Headquarter” during the so-called Afghan Jihad, making it a “breeding ground of terrorism.” Once allies and holy warriors, are now dangerously poised against the United States and her allies, neighbours and democratic societies, which are under threat from fanatics who ruthlessly resort to deadly terrorist attacks.

While succinctly highlighting future challenges after exit of United States from Afghanistan and growing religious fanaticism and terrorism in and around Pakistan, Dr. Ishtiaq realistically conveys that nothing will change unless the “Garrison State” paves way to a secular and democratic state.

It is high time that all the stakeholders should initiate a meaningful dialogue for converting the state into a modern, democratic country that is the only road to salvation. The tragedy of the state is that its de facto rulers and cronies working for them give a damn to the aspirations of people and have done nothing worthwhile for the less-privileged. It is hoped that the new government will steer clear of this and learn the necessary lessons from history.

Dr Ikramul Haq

3 comments

  • I am most pleasantly surprised that Dr Ikramul Haq and his life-partner Husaima Bukhari have written an article in which the argument I developed in my book, Pakistan: The Garrison: Origins, Evolution, Consequences (1947-2011), has been applied by them to argue that if Pakistan is to be a Welfare State it cannot do so by being the so-called Fortress of Islam. Peace within and peace without are important to save scarce resources from a vain attempt to be some launchpad of jihad. Simultaneously the political leaders should seriously commit themselves to the rules of parliamentary democracy. The people of Pakistan have given their verdict. They want change and they want an end to corruption. Without developing a democratic culture no progress can be made.

  • Please use this text because I misspelt the name of Huzaima Bukhari with an ‘s’ instead of a ‘z’. I am most pleasantly surprised that Dr Ikramul Haq and his life-partner Huzaiima Bukhari have written an article in which the argument I developed in my book, Pakistan: The Garrison: Origins, Evolution, Consequences (1947-2011), has been applied by them to argue that if Pakistan is to be a Welfare State it cannot do so by being the so-called Fortress of Islam. Peace within and peace without are important to save scarce resources from a vain attempt to be some launchpad of jihad. Simultaneously the political leaders should seriously commit themselves to the rules of parliamentary democracy. The people of Pakistan have given their verdict. They want change and they want an end to corruption. Without developing a democratic culture no progress can be made.

  • Indeed a precise and realistic narration of our nation s
    State of affairs and productive suggestions and hopefull expectations to become a country what the founders dreamed
    Hopefully change in the leadership character will trickle down to the individual to reform each one of us
    We do have the potential to ascend if circumstances change

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